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"Reflection of Mt. McKinley on Wonder Lake in Denali National Park, Alaska, circa 1988." Randy Brandon Collection, Anchorage Museum, B2016.019.06458.036.04.04.
"Bridge across Hess Creek Canyon, leading the the Hartley house, circa 1885." George Fox University Photographs. GFU.01.09. George Fox University Archives. Murdock Library. George Fox University.
Unknown, "Students in Airplane, 1946." Linfield College Archives Photograph Collection. Image. Submission 113.
"Dr. Henry Fielding Reed leading a Mazama party down the soon-to-be-named Reed Glacier on Mount Hood, 1901." Mazama Library and Historical Collections, VM1993.020 Mt Hood, 1901.
Oregon Metro Archives.
"Deputy Seth Davidson rides his motorcycle up Beacon Rock on March 18, 1930. From the records of the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office." Multnomah County Archives.
"Mount Hood from Lost Lake, circa 1910." Kiser Photo Co. photographs, Org. Lot 140, bb000223, Oregon Historical Society Research Library.
“University of Oregon Medical School football team, 1894,” OHSU Digital Commons, accessed August 16, 2018.
"Old Fort Road Campus, circa 1950s," University Archives, Oregon Institute of Technology.
"Belle Bloom Gevurtz, Sarah Goodman, Ophelia Goodman, Helen Goodman, Lillian Heldfond, and Ann Zaik at Cannon Beach, circa 1914," Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, OJM2996.
"Men repairing the dome of Congregation Beth Israel building on NW Flanders St., designed in 1925 by Herman Brookman, 1981," Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, OJM9966.
"View of OAC from Lower Campus, 1909." Oregon State University Archives and Special Collections.
"Woman with Child, n.d.," C.M. Russell Museum, Great Falls, Montana. Joseph Henry Sharp Photograph Collection.
"Green Lake Park, 1985." Seattle Arts Commission. [Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs]. Seattle Municipal Archives.
"Aerial view of Century 21 World's Fair, 1962." City Light Negatives, Seattle Municipal Archives.
"Students studying in the library, University of Washington, circa 1908-1909," Arthur Dean University of Washington Photograph Album, PH Coll 903, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.
"PH037_b089_S00208," Angelus Studio photographs, 1880s-1940s, University of Oregon. Libraries. Special Collections & University Archives.
Asahel Curtis, "Forest ranger cabin in the Olympic National Forest in the Elwha Valley, 1924." Conservation Department, Planning and Development division, Lantern Slide Shows, Washington State Archives.
Asahel Curtis, "Stacking alfalfa hay near Grandview, circa 1925." Conservation Department, Planning and Development division, Lantern Slide Shows, Washington State Archives.
"Inauguration of Governor Ferry, November 11, 1889." Rogers (photographer), Inauguration of Governor Ferry Photographs, 1889, Washington State Archives, Digital Archives.
Asahel Curtis, "Yakima Pears." Washington State Library collection of photographs by Asahel Curtis, circa 1920-1940 (MS 0544-29).
"Student in Professor Frank Chalfant's Phonetics Laboratory," 1912. The lab was an early precursor to today's Foreign Language Lab. Washington State University Lantern Slides collection.
Bill Phillips, "Wheel Shop employees in Livingston during the last days of Livingston BN Shops," Park County." Yellowstone Gateway Museum.

#AskAnArchivist Day is October 3!

12 Sep 2018 11:11 AM | Rachael Woody (Administrator)

Please see SAA's website for more details: https://www2.archivists.org/initiatives/askanarchivist-day

What Is #AskAnArchivist Day?

It’s an opportunity to:

  • Break down the barriers that make archivists seem inaccessible.
  • Talk directly to the public—via Twitter—about what you do, why it’s important and, of course, the interesting records with which you work.
  • Join with archivists around the country and the world to make an impact on the public’s understanding of archives while celebrating American Archives Month!
  • Interact with users, supporters, and prospective supporters about the value of archives.
  • Hear directly from the public about what they’re most interested in learning about from archives and archivists. 

How Does It Work?

On October 3, archivists around the country will take to Twitter to respond to questions tweeted with the hashtag #AskAnArchivist. Take this opportunity to engage via your personal and/or institutional Twitter accounts and to respond to questions posed directly to you or more generally to all participants.

Questions will vary widely, from the silly (What do archivists talk about around the water cooler?) to the practical (What should I do to be sure that my emails won’t get lost?), but each question will be an opportunity to share more about our work and our profession with the public. 

Between now and October 3:

PROMOTE #AskAnArchivist Day among your users and constituents via your institution’s website, Twitter account, blog, newsletter, and any other mediums available to you. Click here for the public announcement (and feel free to pick up language from it for your own promotions). Memes are a great way to drum up excitement and are easily created through an online meme generator. Check out examples of previous promotional “Philosoraptor” memes here and here.

For additional inspiration on what your promotion of #AskAnArchivist Day might look like, check out what your peers have done:

And these great examples of museums' promotions of #AskACurator Day:

Examples of possible Twitter promotion:

  • Happy #AskAnArchivist Day! Our archivists are waiting for YOUR questions. Tag us at @TWITTERHANDLE and use #AskAnArchivist.
  • Archivists at @TWITTERHANDLE are gearing up for #AskAnArchivist Day on October 3! Literally—documents and photo boxes stacked and waiting!

ENCOURAGE the public to use #AskAnArchivist and your institution’s Twitter handle (e.g., @smithsonian) when asking questions so you won’t miss any that are intended for you and so we will be able to track questions and answers to measure overall participation.

TALK to your staff and colleagues to develop a plan for responding to tweets throughout the day.  Will one person respond to all tweets?  Will you share the task? Will individuals sign up for time slots and let the public know who will be available when?

Here’s one example:

  • During #AskACurator Day, one person at the Indianapolis Museum of Art was selected to monitor both the general hashtag and tweets sent directly to @imamuseum. When direct questions came in or interesting general questions were posed via the hashtag, the designated monitor sent the questions to participating curators via email. The curators (and their archivist!) replied with their answers, and the monitor posted all answers from the @imamuseum Twitter account. 

CREATE an institutional Twitter account if you don’t already have one. #AskAnArchivist Day and American Archives Month are both great opportunities to start one! Get started here.

And if an institutional Twitter account is not an option for you, answer questions from your personal Twitter account! If your institutional affiliation and job title are not already listed on your profile, be sure to add that for the duration of #AskAnArchivist Day.

TWEET and GREET! Take advantage of this opportunity to join with archivists from around the country to talk to and hear directly from the public on October 3.

If you plan to participate, please email SAA Editorial and Production Coordinator Abigail Christian with your Twitter handle so we can add you to the 2018 list of participants.


Please contact Colleen Needham (Communications Chair) with any questions. 

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